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Chorus pedals compared



This page contains audio samples and brief description of diverse chorus pedals. It is not intended to be a thorough and deep analysis of each of these pedals, but might help you get a overall view of what different pedals sound like in the same environment with the same input sample.

Recording Setup
Recording Setup
The samples are recorded straight through a Line6 Pod XT, so no amplifiers, microphones or studios were used. Therefore, the samples will not give the best achievable sounds that can be achieved from each of these pedals, but since all are in the exactly same environment a comparison can be made. The samples are played with a Ibanez JSM100 Hollowbody guitar using the bridge pickup.



Arion SCH-1 Stereo Chorus
Arion SCH-1 Stereo Chorus
Arion offered a wide range of low budget effects pedals during the mid to late eighties built in Japan. From all the plastic cased effects pedals the SCH-1 is pretty much the only one that has received mentionable attention. Even some professional players (e.g. Scott Henderson, Michael Landau, Dan Huff) chose this unit as part of their rig since it offers a very lush and sweet chorus and especially the Leslie-type sound has received lots of compliments.
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Arion SCH-1 Stereo Chorus Pedal   Arion SCH-1 Stereo Chorus Pedal   Arion SCH-1 Stereo Chorus Pedal   Arion SCH-1 Stereo Chorus Circuit Board   Arion SCH-1 Stereo Chorus Circuit Board
Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1
Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1
The Chorus Ensemble CE-1 was published June 1976 and it is based on a circuit which Roland used in their JC-120 Jazz Chorus amplifiers from 1975. Roland had founded Boss in order to specialize on effects, and the CE-1 was their first effects pedal and at the same time the first commercial pedal sized chorus. The CE-1 can thus be easily accredited to be the "mother of choruses". Since then, Boss has sold over 7 million pedals, being one of the biggest company in the business. The CE-1 was also the first effect pedal to utilize the BBD (Bucket Brigade Driver) chip, a analog delay line in an integrated circuit. The IC (originally designed by Philips ) had just been lisensed to Matsushita and thus was availiable for mass production. For more details see the Boss Chorus Ensemble article.
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Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1 Circuit Board   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1 Circuit Board
Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-2
Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-2
CE-2 was the successor of the CE-1 and was released October 1979. It uses a MN3007 and MN3101 combination (BBD delay circuit and clock driver) to achieve the chorus effect. More information on this unit can be found in the Boss Chorus Ensemble article.
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Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-2 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-2 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-2 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-2 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-2 Circuit Board
Boss Bass Chorus CE-2B
Boss Bass Chorus CE-2B
The Boss Bass Chorus CE-2B was manufatured 1987-1995, first in Japan, later in Taiwan. It uses the same MN3007 and MN3101 combination as the CE-2, but has in addition a blend knob to control the balance between the dry and the 'wet' signal. Although it is designed and "tuned" for bass, it works and sounds excellent also on guitar.
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Boss Bass Chorus CE-2B Pedal   Boss Bass Chorus CE-2B Pedal   Boss Bass Chorus CE-2B Pedal   Boss Bass Chorus CE-2B Pedal   Boss Bass Chorus CE-2B Circuit Board
Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-5
Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-5
CE-5 was released 1991 and is manufactured still today. The circuit level implementation is quite different from it's predecessors, which becomes also apparent in the sound. Added EQ-controls add versatility and by controlling the ratio of the direct signal and the effect, the pedal can be used to create soundscapes from a slight shimmer to strongly vibrating sounds. There are two versions of this pedal, one with a analog BBD circuitry and one with a digital implementation. More information on this unit can be found in the Boss Chorus Ensemble article.
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Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-5 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-5 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-5 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-5 Pedal   Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-5 Circuit Board
Boss Digital Dimension DC-3
Boss DC-3
The DC-3 was manufactured in Japan and sold from 1988-1993. It was a digital implementation (unlike it's analog predeccessor DC-2) and produces a chorus sound that is a bit different from other chorus units. Compared to most other chorus pedals, the DC-3 does not add as much vibrato as the depth of the effect is increased, thus resulting in a more natural sound, yet giving the the dimensional and spatial feel.
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Boss DC-3 Pedal   Boss DC-3 Pedal   Boss DC-3 Pedal   Boss DC-3 Pedal   Boss DC-3 Circuit Board
Dod FX65 Stereo Chorus
Dod FX65 Stereo Chorus
A smooth well-voiced chorus manufactured from 1986-1996 in the U.S. This chorus does not have an overly strong modulation effect, but offers a warm and subtle sound ideal for a nice doubling or moderate vibes. It features controls for Speed and Depth of the sweep as well as the Delay-Time. Similar to the Boss CE-2, the Dod FX-65 uses a MN3007 and MN3101 combination.
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Dod FX65 Stereo Chorus Pedal   Dod FX65 Stereo Chorus Pedal   Dod FX65 Stereo Chorus Pedal   Dod FX65 Stereo Chorus Circuit Board
Ibanez BC9 Bi-Mode Chorus
Ibanez BC9
The Ibanez 9-series was made between 1982 until 1985, but it seems the BC9 was only made in 1984 in Japan. The Bi-Mode Chorus features two choruses with independent speed and width settings to achieve a multitude of spatial effects and sounds, the driving delay line being a combination of an MN3102 and an MN3207.
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Ibanez BC9 Pedal   Ibanez BC9 Pedal   Ibanez BC9 Pedal   Ibanez BC9 Circuit Board
Ibanez BCL Bi-Mode Chorus
Ibanez BCL
The successor of the BC9 was the BCL from the Master-series manufactured 1985-1986. Also this chorus features two choruses with independent speed and width settings to achieve a multitude of spatial effects and sounds, the driving delay line being a combination of an MN3102 and an MN3207.
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Ibanez BCL Pedal   Ibanez BCL Pedal   Ibanez BCL Pedal   Ibanez BCL Circuit Board Ibanez BCL Circuit Board
Ibanez CS9 Stereo Chorus
Ibanez CS9
The CS9 made its original appearance 1982-1984 in original 9-series and was later reissued around the mid nineties. It uses the MN3102 and MN3207 BBD/clock-driver combination and has controls for the Speed and Width of the effect.
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Ibanez CS9 Pedal   Ibanez CS9 Pedal   Ibanez CS9 Pedal   Ibanez CS9 Circuit Board Ibanez CS9 Circuit Board
Ibanez CSL Stereo Chorus
Ibanez CSL
The Ibanez L-series (or Master-series) was produced in 1985-1986 before being replaced by the 10-series. It uses the same BBD/clock-driver combination as used in the 9- and 10-series (MN3102 and MN3207) and has controls for the Speed and Width of the effect.
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Ibanez CSL Pedal   Ibanez CSL Pedal   Ibanez CSL Pedal   Ibanez CSL Circuit Board
Ibanez DCF10 Chorus/Flanger
Ibanez DCF10
The DCF10 is the big brother of the DSC10 with a rather large portfolio of sounds ranging from subtle wibes to almost self-oscillating noisewalls. It was manufactured for a short period of time during the early nineties in Japan. It has controls for the delay time (D-Time and a range toggle) and delay level, Speed, Width and Regeneration.
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Ibanez DCF10 Pedal   Ibanez DCF10 Pedal   Ibanez DCF10 Pedal   Ibanez DCF10 Circuit Board Ibanez DCF10 Circuit Board
Ibanez DSC10 Digital Chorus
Ibanez DSC10 Digital Chorus
The DSC10 Digital Chorus was produced between 1990-1992 and features controls for Speed, Width and Color and a slider selection toggle switch for the Delay Time.
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Ibanez DSC10 Digital Chorus Pedal   Ibanez DSC10 Digital Chorus Pedal   Ibanez DSC10 Digital Chorus Pedal   Ibanez DSC10 Digital Chorus Circuit Board   Ibanez DSC10 Digital Chorus Circuit Board
Ibanez SC10 Super Stereo Chorus
Ibanez SC10
The SC-10 was released 1986 and manufactured until 1992. It is very similar to it's predeccessor the CSL but offers also a control for the Delay Time. The production of these units was moved from Japan to Taiwan during the late eighties.
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Ibanez SC10 Pedal   Ibanez SC10 Pedal   Ibanez SC10 Pedal   Ibanez SC10 Circuit Board
Ross Chorus
Ross Chorus
Ross was a division of Kustom Electronics located in Chanute, Kansas, and offered a small array of effects throughout the mid to late seventies. The Ross brand was eventually sold around 1980 and the Ross effects were still produced in Taiwan for a couple of years before being discontinued. The Ross Chorus is a nice sounding unit and is based on the MN3007 and MN3101 combination.
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Ross Chorus Pedal   Ross Chorus Pedal   Ross Chorus Pedal   Ross Chorus Circuit Board
t.c. electronic - Stereo Chorus+ Pitch Modulator & Flanger
T.C. Electronics Chorus+ Flanger Pedal
t.c.electronics was founded in 1976 by brothers Kim and John Rishöj in Risskov, Denmark, and has since then offered various high quality studio equipment. The Stereo Chorus+ Pitch Modulator & Flanger was indroduced in 1982 and later reissued in 1991. It is a very versatile and sweet sounding unit that can be found on the pedalboards of many pro musicians. This unit is from the original series, the reissued version have slightly different appearance.
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T.C. Electronics Chorus+ Flanger Pedal   T.C. Electronics Chorus+ Flanger Pedal   T.C. Electronics Chorus+ Flanger Pedal   T.C. Electronics Chorus+ Flanger Circuit Board
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